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Fall 2017 Classical Studies Courses

Courses are divided into three areas of study: Classics in English, Greek, and Latin. All available courses can also be viewed via BannerWeb. All courses are one unit (unless otherwise indicated).

Classics in English

Classics 220 – Introduction to Archaeology
TR 10:30-11:45 am Baughan
An introduction to archaeological method and theory, with special focus on the archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean basin. We will consider the history of the discipline and major advances and trends in archaeological science and interpretation while examining select case studies from the Mediterranean world (e.g., Çatal Höyük, Knossos, and Pompeii). There will be a community-based learning component centered on planning an Archaeology Day at the Science Museum of Virginia. Satisfies the Social Analysis (FSSA) requirement. This course also serves as a prerequisite for application to work on the Hacımusalar Excavations in Turkey. No prerequisite.

Classics 398 – Special Topics: Writing Systems of the World
MW 1:30-2:45 pm – Gunkel
Writing is arguably mankind’s most important cultural achievement. In this course, we will trace its development from Sumerian clay tablets to your messaging app. Along the way, we will consider the relationship between writing and “modern” civilization, language, law, and verbal art. We will also learn to identify the major writing systems of the world and to understand how they work. No prerequisite.

Classics 398 – Special Topics: Intro to Digital Humanities
MW 1:30-2:45 pm – Tilton
Digital Humanities or “DH” brings the application of computing to humanities questions. In this course, we will explore applying computational methods including text analysis, mapping, and network analysis to humanities data. The first class of each week will be dedicated to discussing the readings and the second will be a practicum where we will apply methods.
No prior programming experience expected or required.
 
Classics 498 – Major Seminar
T 6:00-8:30 pm – Simpson
Required of junior and senior Classics majors.  Research methods and the writing and presentation of a research paper in the specific major.

Classics 499 Independent Study
T 8:00-8:50 am – Stevenson
Available only through departmental approval prior to registration.

Classics in Greek

Greek 101 – Elementary Greek
MWF 12:00-12:50 pm – Simpson
Introduction to ancient Greek, the language of Homer, Plato and the New Testament.  We will use a 'reading approach' that aims at helping students develop mental habits and reading strategies that will lead to successful reading of more complex Greek in future semesters. Partially fulfills Foreign Language (COM2) requirement. No prerequisite.

Greek 201 – Intermediate Greek
MWF 12:00-12:50 pm – Baughan
We will complete our introduction to Greek grammar and embark on our first readings in unadapted Greek. Partially fulfills Foreign Language (COM2) requirement. Prerequisite: Greek 102 or permission of the department.

Greek 302– Greek Drama
MWF 3:00-3:50 pm – Simpson
We will read Sophocles’ Oedipus the King in Greek and study his extant plays as they may give evidence of a developing dramaturgy and an on-going conversation with the city of Athens. 

Greek 498 – Major Seminar
T 6:00-8:30 pm – Simpson
Required of junior and senior Classics majors.  Research methods and the writing and presentation of a research paper in the specific major.  

Greek 499 – Independent Study
R 8:00-8:50 am – Stevenson
Available only through departmental permission arranged prior to registration.

Classics in Latin

Latin 101 – Elementary Latin
MWF 10:30-11:20 am – Gunkel
Introduction to the language of ancient Rome  -- also the language of learning for over a thousand years, the source of modern Romance languages, and a wealth of English vocabulary. Partially fulfills Foreign Language (COM2) requirement. No prerequisite.  

Latin 201 – Intermediate Latin
2 sections: MWF 10:30-11:20 am – Stevenson; 1:30-2:20 pm – Stevenson
The introduction to basic language skills is completed, while reading from an authentic Roman novel. Prerequisite: Latin 102 or departmental placement. Partially fulfills Foreign Language (COM2) requirement.

Latin 398 – Selected Topics: Humanity/Liberal Arts
WF 4:30-5:45 pm – Rankine
How is the category of "human being" crafted among Roman authors? How does the category of "humanity/humanities" pertain to the role of the liberal arts (artes liberales)? We will read a selection of authors, the chief among which will be Cicero and Seneca, on the practical evolution of a Roman philosophical category of humanities and the liberal arts. Students in this class will have the primary reading pertaining to the construction of the liberal arts in the classical world. Prerequisite: Latin 202 or permission of department.

Latin 498 – Major Seminar
T 6:00-8:30 pm – Simpson
Required of junior and senior Classics majors.  Research methods and the writing and presentation of a research paper in the specific major.

Latin 499 – Independent Study
W 9:00-9:50 am – Stevenson
Available only through departmental approval prior to registration.

Other Important Course Offerings       

FYS 100 – Death & Commemoration in Antiquity
TR 1:30-2:45 pm – Baughan
Through literary texts, inscriptions, and monuments from the ancient Mediterranean (including Egypt and the Near East as well as the Classical world), we will explore ancient approaches to death and memorial and what these may tell us about ancient beliefs, social structures, and ideologies. Primary source material will be drawn from: Egyptian tombs and funerary texts; Gilgamesh and Near Eastern funerary monuments; Greek and Latin poetry (works of Homer, Pindar, Bacchylides, Sophocles, Vergil, Propertius, and others); Greek and Roman historical accounts (such as Herodotus, Thucydides, and Suetonius); Greek, Etruscan, and Roman funerary art and epitaphs; and archaeological evidence for burial rituals. Themes to be explored include: death and the ‘hero,’ the tomb monument as a source of memory, the language of burials, the symbolism of funerary rituals, the significance of funerary banquets, war memorials and communal graves, and beliefs concerning the ‘underworld’ and afterlife. 

Please visit the major/minor page for full details on our curricula and major/minor requirements.