Richmond Home

Courses

Our courses are discussion based, providing for close and free interaction between teachers and students. You will share in the creation of an academic experience where learning, the testing of ideas and the exploring of texts and cultures are done actively and with personal engagement.

In our language courses, this may go so far as to have you take part in a performance––perhaps of something you have helped write––done in Greek or Latin. You and your classmates will be encouraged to appreciate the languages as languages and to make them live.

Courses
Classics Courses
CLSC 101 Classical Mythology
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSLT)
Description
Introduces students to the myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans and to some of the modern theoretical and interpretive approaches (e.g., historical, religious, psychoanalytic, anthropological) to the study of myths in ancient literature.

CLSC 201 Classical Elements in the English Language
Units: 1
Description
A study of how Latin and Greek have contributed to English vocabulary -- basic, learned, and technical. In addition to developing the skill of seeing within English words meaningful prefixes, roots, and suffixes, topics of interest include the history of English, the expansion of English vocabulary via borrowing and neologism, and the ways words' meanings may change over time.
One of the most important ways Greece and Rome connect with our world is through the words and word-parts English has taken from Greek and Latin. Classics 201 will examine this linguistic connection and teach the skill of seeing and understanding roots, prefixes and suffixes that make up many English words and that reveal a lot about their history and meaning. The course will include specialized terminologies used in medicine and law. No prerequisite. Simpson, TR 2:15-3:30.

CLSC 205 Greek and Roman Mythology: Epic
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSLT)
Description
Selected mythic themes in Greek and Roman epic literature from Homer to Ovid. Emphasis on myths prominent in Western literature.
Stories of gods and heroes as told by Homer, Vergil and Ovid. We will attempt to understand how myths arose and functioned in the oral culture of the early Greeks, and how they were used by poets in the literary cultures that followed. Satisfies the Literary Studies (FSLT) requirement. No prerequisite. Folch, MW 3:45-5:00.

CLSC 207 Greek Magic
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSHT)
Description
Exploration of magic as a means to understanding and affecting the natural world. Major topics include erotic magic, dreams and divination, ritual purification, sacred plants, and healing.

CLSC 208 Mythology: Greek Drama
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSLT)
Description
Study of myths preserved in Greek dramas, and historical and literary analysis of these plays.

CLSC 210 A History of Early Medicine
Units: 1
Description
Medical concepts and practices of several ancient peoples of the Aegean and Mediterranean, with a focus on the Greeks and Romans. The development of medicine in Western, Byzantine, Islamic, and Arabic traditions is traced into modern times.

CLSC 212 Dining and Drinking in Classical Antiquity
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement FSSA
Description
A social history of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world, from communal religious feasts to private banquets. Using primary ancient sources (literary texts, artistic representations, and archaeological finds), examines the roles of dining and drinking in ancient societies and social ideologies.

CLSC 220 Introduction to Archaeology
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement FSSA
Description
What can we learn about people and societies, past and present, from their material remains? Introduces archaeological method and theory, with special focus on sites of the ancient Mediterranean basin.

CLSC 301 Greek Art and Archaeology
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSVP)
Description
A survey of architecture, sculpture, ceramics, and painting in the Greek world, from the Bronze Age through the Classical period, and an exploration of how art and buildings functioned in Greek society. Introduces students to basic methods of analyzing and interpreting archaeological remains.

CLSC 302 Roman Art and Archaeology
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSVP)
Description
A survey of Roman art and architecture from the early republic through the late empire, and throughout the Roman world, from Spain to Syria. Explores the meanings of 'style' in Roman art and the social and political significance of Roman sculpture, painting, and architecture.
A survey of Roman art and architecture from the early republic through the late empire, and throughout the Roman world, from Spain to Syria. This course explores the meanings of "style" in Roman art and the social and political significance of Roman sculpture, painting, and architecture. Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts (FSVP) requirement. No prerequisite. Baughan, MWF, 2:40-3:30.

CLSC 304 The Feminine in Greco-Roman Literature
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSLT)
Description
Concept of the feminine as seen in major works of Greek and Roman poetry, prose, and drama.

CLSC 305 Greek and Roman Values
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSHT)
Description
Investigation of ancient Greco-Roman values -- artistic, religious, political, and personal -- as found in an eclectic survey of primary texts.

CLSC 306 The Classical Tradition
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSHT)
Description
Legacy of classical Greece and Rome in Medieval, Renaissance, and modern worlds.

CLSC 308 Women in Greece and Rome
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSSA)
Description
Structure of Greek and Roman societies based on analysis of the position of women within them. Comparison with other disenfranchised groups, particularly ethnic minorities.

CLSC 312 The Land of Hellas: Ancient Topography-Modern Legacy
Units: 1
Description
(Summer only; taught abroad.) Study of ancient remains of Bronze Age and Classical Greece and their role as a binding force for the ethnic and national identity of the modern country.

CLSC 320 Cultural Property: Archaeology, Ethics, and Law
Units: 1
Description
Who owns the past? Exploration of current issues of archaeological ethics and cultural heritage management. Topics may range from the ancient history of looting and appropriation to the illicit antiquities market and site preservation today, and how local and international property and tax laws affect collecting practices. Class presentations and research papers explore these legal and ethical issues through specific case studies, primarily from the Mediterranean region.

CLSC 321 Archaeology of the Middle East
Units: 1
Description
Art and cultures of the ancient Middle East, from the dawn of civilization to the age of Alexander, with a primary focus on Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Syro-Palestine. While surveying the ancient sites and monuments of these regions of the Middle East, we will also consider how cultural heritage has played a role in the history of archaeology and the creation of modern identities, and how it may be used in varying ways today as 'cultural capital.'

CLSC 329 The Ancient World in Cinema
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSLT)
Description
Examines cinematic representations of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean, viewed through a variety of literary and cinematic genres in European and American cinema of the 20th Century. The films offer an opportunity to reflect on how our various modern visions of (and desires for) the ancient world illuminate the present as much as they animate the past. Students will read selections from Greek and Roman history and poetry (in translation) in conjunction with weekly viewings and written assignments; secondary readings will be drawn from contemporary film criticism and theory.

CLSC 388 Individual Internship
Units: .5-1
Description
Supervised independent work. No more than 1.5 units of internship in any one department and 3.5 units of internship overall may be counted toward required degree units.
Prerequisites
Permission of department.

CLSC 398 Selected Topics
Units: 1
Description
Topics or themes in Classics.
Selected Topics: Introduction to Archaeology – An introduction to archaeological method and theory, with special focus on the archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean basin. We will consider the history of the discipline and major advances and trends in archaeological science and interpretation while examining select case-studies from the Mediterranean world (e.g., Çatal Höyük, Knossos, and Pompeii). There will be a “hands-on” component introducing students to basic techniques of field survey and recording.  Students taking this course may apply to participate in the Central Lydia Archaeology Survey (near Sardis in western Turkey) in summer 2009. No prerequisite. Baughan, TR 12:45-2:00.

CLSC 406 Summer Undergraduate Research
Units: 0
Description
Documentation of the work of students who receive summer fellowships to conduct research [or produce a creative arts project] in the summer. The work must take place over a minimum of 8 weeks, the student must engage in the project full-time (at least 40 hours per week) during this period, and the student must be the recipient of a fellowship through the university. Graded S/U.
Prerequisites
Approval for summer Arts and Sciences fellowship by faculty mentor

CLSC 499 Independent Study
Units: .5-1
Description
Content suited to the requirements and interests of student, chosen by student and faculty director in advance of the semester in which the independent study is to be done.
Available only through departmental permission arranged prior to registration.
Prerequisites
Permission of department.

Greek Courses
GREK 101 Elementary Greek
Units: 1
Description
Introduction to ancient Greek language and culture.

GREK 102 Elementary Greek
Units: 1
Description
Introduction to ancient Greek language and culture.
Prerequisites
Greek 101.

GREK 201 Intermediate Greek
Units: 1
Description
Continued study of ancient Greek language and culture plus selected readings.
Prerequisites
Greek 102.

GREK 202 Intermediate Greek
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (COM2)
Description
Continued study of ancient Greek language and culture plus selected readings.
Prerequisites
Greek 201.

GREK 301 Greek Epic
Units: 1
Description
Readings from Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey."
Prerequisites
Greek 202 or permission of department.

GREK 302 Greek Drama
Units: 1
Description
Readings from Sophocles and Euripides.
Prerequisites
Greek 202 or permission of department.

GREK 303 Greek Historiography
Units: 1
Description
Readings from Herodotus and Thucydides.
Prerequisites
Greek 202 or permission of department.

GREK 304 Greek Philosophical Prose
Units: 1
Description
Readings from Plato and Aristotle.
Prerequisites
Greek 202 or permission of department.

GREK 398 Selected Topics
Units: 1
Description
Topics or themes in Greek literature. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
Prerequisites
Greek 202 or permission of department.

GREK 406 Summer Undergraduate Research
Units: 0
Description
Documentation of the work of students who receive summer fellowships to conduct research [or produce a creative arts project] in the summer. The work must take place over a minimum of 8 weeks, the student must engage in the project full-time (at least 40 hours per week) during this period, and the student must be the recipient of a fellowship through the university. Graded S/U.
Prerequisites
Approval for summer Arts and Sciences fellowship by faculty mentor

GREK 498 Major Seminar
Units: 1
Description
Required of all majors. Methodologies appropriate to Greek studies and the writing of a research paper.
All Greek junior and senior majors must take this course. The course comprises the preparation and writing of a major research paper or completion of a major project. Prerequisite: student must be a declared junior or senior Greek major. Laskaris,  R 7:00-9:40 pm.
Prerequisites
Permission of department.

GREK 499 Independent Study
Units: .5-1
Description
Content suited to the requirements and interests of student, chosen by student and faculty director in advance of the semester in which the independent study is to be done.
Available only through departmental permission arranged prior to registration.
Prerequisites
Permission of department.

Latin Courses
LATN 101 Elementary Latin
Units: 1
Description
Introduction to Latin language and Roman culture.

LATN 102 Elementary Latin
Units: 1
Description
Introduction to Latin language and Roman culture.
Prerequisites
Latin 101.

LATN 201 Intermediate Latin
Units: 1
Description
Continued study of Latin language and Roman culture plus selected readings.
Prerequisites
Latin 102 or the permission of department.

LATN 202 Intermediate Latin
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (COM2)
Description
Continued study of Latin language and Roman culture plus selected readings.
Prerequisites
Latin 201.

LATN 301 Plautus
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSVP)
Description
Study of Roman comedy using Latin texts, videotapes, and live performance.
Prerequisites
Latin 307 or permission of department.

LATN 302 Ovid
Units: 1
Description
Mythic traditions of Greco-Roman culture.
Prerequisites
Latin 307 or permission of department.

LATN 303 Roman Epic
Units: 1
Description
Special emphasis on Vergil's "Aeneid."
Prerequisites
Latin 202 or by departmental approval.

LATN 304 Roman Historiography
Units: 1
Description
Emphasis on Livy and Tacitus.
Prerequisites
Latin 307 or permission of department.

LATN 305 Horace
Units: 1
Description
The lyric poetry.
Prerequisites
Latin 307 or permission of department.

LATN 306 Roman Philosophical Literature
Units: 1
Description
Special emphasis on Lucretius' "De Rerum Natura" or Cicero's "Tusculan Disputations."
Prerequisites
Latin 202 or permission of department.

LATN 307 Catullus
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSLT)
Description
Literary analysis of selected readings.
A course in literary criticism addressing the corpus of Catullus' poetry in all of its surprising variety. We will study key poems in depth, and assess the corpus as a whole, in an effort to come to terms with questions such as "How good is Catullus' poetry?", "When it is good, what makes it good?" and "How important is Catullus as a poet?" Readings in current Catullan criticism and 20th century English poetry will help our discussions. In addition to improving as readers of Latin, students will learn analytical and critical methods that will be of use in all subsequent Latin courses. Satisfies the Literary Studies (FSLT) requirement. Prerequisite: Latin 202 or permission of department. Simpson, MWF 1:35-2:25.
Prerequisites
Latin 202 or permission of department.

LATN 308 The Novel
Units: 1
Description
Latin novels of Petronius and Apuleius.
Prerequisites
Latin 307 or permission of department.

LATN 309 Cicero
Units: 1
Description
Theory and history of Roman oratory.
Prerequisites
Latin 307 or permission of department.

LATN 398 Selected Topics
Units: 1
Description
Topics or themes in Roman literature. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
The Augustan period of Latin literature, featuring the poetry of Vergil, Tibullus, Sulpicia, Propertius, Horace and Ovid, has fascinated readers for millennia. Most recently these poets tendency towards intensive and subtle riffing off each other's (and often their own earlier) verses has drawn critics into an intense discussion of allusions as well as the theoretical understanding of allusion itself. In this course we will focus on the remarkable network of allusions that Vergil's Aeneid left in the 30 years after its publication. Ovid's Metamorphoses will be at the heart of our reading, but we will attempt to ferret out allusivity in all the other major poets of the period and gain a basic appreciation of the mechanics of poetic allusion. Stevenson, TR 9:45-11:00.
Prerequisites
Latin 307 or permission of department.

LATN 406 Summer Undergraduate Research
Units: 0
Description
Documentation of the work of students who receive summer fellowships to conduct research [or produce a creative arts project] in the summer. The work must take place over a minimum of 8 weeks, the student must engage in the project full-time (at least 40 hours per week) during this period, and the student must be the recipient of a fellowship through the university. Graded S/U.
Prerequisites
Approval for summer Arts and Sciences fellowship by faculty mentor

LATN 411 The Teaching of High School Latin
Units: 1
Description
Theory and practice of teaching Latin. Designed to enable teachers to meet state licensure requirements.
Prerequisites
Latin 202 or permission of department.

LATN 498 Major Seminar
Units: 1
Description
Required of all majors. Methodologies appropriate to Latin studies and the writing of a research paper.
All Latin junior and senior majors must take this course. The course comprises the preparation and writing of a major research paper or completion of a major project. Prerequisite: student must be a declared junior or senior Latin major. Laskaris, R 7:00-9:40 p.m.
Prerequisites
Permission of department.

LATN 499 Independent Study
Units: .5-1
Description
Content suited to the requirements and interests of student, chosen by student and faculty director in advance of the semester in which the independent study is to be done.
Available only through departmental permission arranged prior to registration.
Prerequisites
Permission of department.