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Spring 2023 Classical Studies Courses

Courses are divided into three areas of study: Classics in English, Greek, and Latin. All available courses can also be viewed via BannerWeb. All courses are one unit (unless otherwise indicated).

Classics in English, Archaeology, and Linguistics

Classics 205 Ancient Myth in Epic Poetry
TR 10:30-11:45 am – Motz
This course will explore stories of gods and heroes as told by Homer, Vergil and Ovid.  We will attempt to understand how myths arose and functioned in the oral culture of early Greece and how myths were used in the literary culture of ancient Rome. Satisfies the Literary Studies Field of Study (FSLT). No prerequisite.

Classics 302 – Roman Art & Archaeology
TR 3:00-4:15 pm – Motz
A survey of Roman art and architecture from the early republic through the late empire, and throughout the Roman world, from Spain to Syria. This course explores the meanings of ‘style’ in Roman art and the social and political significance of Roman sculpture, painting, and architecture. Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts Field of Study (FSVP); WGSS Special Cross-List. No prerequisite.

Classics 398 – Digital Approaches to the Past
TR 12:00-1:15 pm – Motz

Classics 499 – Independent Study
TBD – Stevenson
Available only through departmental approval prior to registration.

Classics in Greek

Greek 102 – Elementary Greek
MWF 12:00-12:50 pm – Simpson
We will continue our study of ancient Greek and the history and culture of classical Greece.  As in Greek 101, emphasis will be placed on mastering essential vocabulary and forms and on practicing reading and other comprehension skills. Prerequisite: Greek 101. Partially satisfies the Communication Skills II Foreign Language requirement (COM II).

Greek 202 – Intermediate Greek
MWF 12:00-12:50 pm – Gunkel
We will continue our study of Greek literature with a focus on the Medea of Euripides.  Students will continue to develop reading and comprehension skills, a working vocabulary, and an understanding of the cultural and literary backgrounds to the dramatic literature of classical Athens. Prerequisite: Greek 201 or permission of the department. Satisfies the Communication Skills II Foreign Language requirement (COM II).

Greek 303 – Greek Historiography
TR 10:30-11:45 am – Gunkel
In this course, we will explore ancient Greek historiography by reading Herodotus, Thucydides, and Plutarch alongside relevant secondary literature. Prerequisite: Greek 202 or permission of the department.

Greek 499 – Independent Study
TBD – Stevenson
Available only through departmental approval prior to registration.

Classics in Latin

Latin 102 – Elementary Latin
MWF 10:30-11:20 am – Gunkel
We will continue our study of Latin and the history and culture of classical Rome.  As in Latin 101, emphasis will be placed on mastering essential grammar and vocabulary and on practicing reading and other comprehension skills. Prerequisite: Latin 101 or permission of department. Partially satisfies the Communication Skills II Foreign Language requirement (COM II).

Latin 202 – Intermediate Latin
2 sections: MWF 10:30-11:20 am - Stevenson; 1:30-2:20 pm – Damer
This course will introduce students to Latin poetry. It will begin with the poet Catullus whose intensely personal and passionate style has seduced readers for thousands of years, and focus in the second half on Ovid’s always witty and often subversive poetry and various later poets in the same tradition. Close attention will be paid to the full artistry of the poetry -- meter, sound play, and word placement -- while we continue to reinforce the vocabulary and grammar learned in the previous three semesters. Prerequisite: Latin 201 or permission of department. Satisfies the Communication Skills II Foreign Language requirement (COM II).

Latin 307– Catullus
TR 1:30-2:45 pm – Simpson
A course in literary criticism addressing the corpus of Catullus' poetry in all of its surprising variety.  We will study key poems in depth, and assess the corpus as a whole, in an effort to come to terms with questions such as 'How good is Catullus' poetry?', 'When it is good, what makes it good?' and 'How important is Catullus as a poet?'  Readings in current Catullan criticism and 20th century English poetry will help our discussions. Satisfies the Literary Studies Field of Study (FSLT)Prerequisite:  Latin 202 or permission of department.

Latin 499 – Independent Study
TBD – Stevenson
Available only through departmental approval prior to registration.
 

Please visit the major/minor page for full details on our curricula and major/minor requirements.