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Fall 2019 Classical Studies Courses

Courses are divided into three areas of study: Classics in English, Greek, and Latin. All available courses can also be viewed via BannerWeb. All courses are one unit (unless otherwise indicated).

Classics in English, Archaeology, and Linguistics

 

Classics 101 - Classical Mythology
TR 9:00-10:15 am – Gunkel
Classics 101 will introduce students to the myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Students will read some of the major works of Greek and Latin literature and come to understand how the Greeks and Romans used myth in their religion, literature, history, and art. Satisfies the Literary Studies requirement (FSLT). No prerequisite. 
 
Classics 208 – Mythology: Greek Drama
TR 3:00-4:15 pm – Simpson
This course will examine the use of mythology in Greek tragedy.  Homer’s Odyssey will provide a basis for reading and interpreting selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Topics of special interest will include theories of the origin of
tragedy, approaches to reading Greek tragedy, and how historical events and social developments in the playwrights’ lifetimes may have influenced how they shaped their stories and characterizations, perhaps even pushing them to a deeper experience of the tragic. Satisfies the Literary Studies requirement (FSLT). No prerequisite.

Classics 220 – Introduction to Archaeology
TR 10:30-11:45 am Baughan
An introduction to archaeological method and theory, with special focus on the archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean basin. We will consider the history of the discipline and major advances and trends in archaeological science and interpretation while examining select case studies from the Mediterranean world (e.g., Çatal Höyük, Knossos, and Pompeii). There will be a community-based learning component centered on East End Cemetery. Satisfies the Social Analysis requirement (FSSA). No prerequisite.
 
Classics 250 – Introduction to Syntax
MW 9:00-10:15 am – Gunkel
CLSC 250 introduces students to the study of syntax, i.e. how words are combined to form phrases, clauses, and sentences. Students learn to identify syntactic units, to analyze complex syntactic structures, and to create model grammars that generate those structures. The course does not presuppose any background in mathematics or foreign languages. Satisfies the Symbolic Reasoning requirement (FSSR). No prerequisite.

Classics 308 Ethnicity, Gender, and Class in Greece and Rome
TR 1:30-2:45 pm – Laskaris
We will consider the constructions of ethnicity, gender, and class in Greek and Roman societies, relying upon primary textual sources (in translation), the archaeological record, and modern scholarship.  How did Greeks and Romans create their own sense of self in relation to the peoples around them?  How did they conceive of masculinity and femininity?  What characterized citizen and immigrant?  Free person and enslaved?  While the primary aim of this course is to increase students’ knowledge of this part of the ancient world, we will also consider how ancient representations may inform our own attitudes and practices.  Satisfies the Social Analysis requirement (FSSA). WGSS special cross-list. No prerequisite.
 
CLSC 329 - The Ancient World in Cinema
MW 10:30-11:45 am – Damer
This course examines cinematic representations of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean, viewed through a variety of literary and cinematic genres in European and American cinema of the 20th Century. The films offer an opportunity to reflect on how our various mod­ern visions of (and desires for) the ancient world illuminate the present as much as they animate the past. Students will read selections from Greek and Roman history and poetry (in translation) in conjunction with weekly viewings and written assignments; secondary readings will be drawn from contemporary film criticism and theory. Fulfills the Literary Studies requirement (FSLT). No prerequisite.

CLSC 398 - Special Topic: Daily Life in Roman Pompeii
TR 3:00-4:15 pm– Damer
The eruption of Mount Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii have sparked the imagination since 79 CE. What was daily life like in a Roman town in the 1st Century in Italy? What can we learn from Roman advertisements, social media, business records, and
contracts? What can we learn from building dedications and correspondence? Through an analysis of such sources, students will explore Roman thinking about citizenship, food, sexuality, gender, slavery, politics, entertainment, friendship, housing, work, death, and public spaces. No prerequisite.

Classics 498 – Major Seminar
W 4:30-7:00 pm– Baughan
Required of senior Classics majors.  Research methods and the writing and presentation of a research paper.

Classics 499 – Independent Study
M 8:00-8:50 am – Laskaris
Available only through departmental approval prior to registration.

Classics in Greek

Greek 101 – Elementary Greek
MWF 12:00-12:50 pm – Simpson
Introduction to ancient Greek, the language of Homer, Plato and the New Testament.  We will use a 'reading approach' that aims at helping students develop mental habits and reading strategies that will lead to successful reading of more complex Greek in future semesters. Partially fulfills Foreign Language requirement (COM2). No prerequisite.

Greek 201 – Intermediate Greek
MWF 12:00-12:50 pm – Baughan
We will complete our introduction to Greek grammar and embark on our first readings in unadapted Greek. Partially fulfills Foreign Language requirement (COM2). Prerequisite: Greek 102 or permission of the department. 

Greek 303 – Greek Historiography
MWF 12:00-12:50 pm– Laskaris
Students will study Herodotus whose expansive and pleasing style should provide more comfortable reading in Greek than the compressed and magisterial Thucydides. We will discuss the Ionic dialect, the extent of Herodotus’ orality (both in composition and in delivery), and the unusual and cohesive nature of Greek narrative. Prerequisite: Greek 202 or permission of the department. 

Greek 498 – Major Seminar
W 4:30-7:00 pm – Baughan
Required of senior Greek majors.  Research methods and the writing and presentation of a research paper.

Greek 499 – Independent Study
T 8:00-8:50 am – Laskaris
Available only through departmental permission arranged prior to registration.

Classics in Latin

Latin 101 – Elementary Latin 
MWF 10:30-11:20 am – Gunkel
Introduction to the language of ancient Rome  -- also the language of learning for over a thousand years, the source of modern Romance languages, and a wealth of English vocabulary. Partially fulfills Foreign Language requirement (COM2). No prerequisite.

Latin 201 – Intermediate Latin
Two sections: MWF 10:30-11:20 am; 1:30-2:20 pm – Laskaris
We will complete the introduction to basic language skills and embark on our first readings in unadapted Latin. Partially fulfills Foreign Language requirement (COM2). Prerequisite: Latin 102 or permission of the department.  
 
Latin 306 – Roman Philosophical Literature
MW 3:00-4:15 pm – Simpson
Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura will be studied as a philosophical text and as an epic poem.  Readings in Cicero and Vergil done in English will round out the debate between Epicureanism and Stoicism that was central to Roman thinking at the time, while readings in
Latin will focus on Lucretius' execution of a plan to represent through his words, verses and books a far-reaching and yet highly integrated view of human life and the world. The important influence of Lucretius on early modern readers will also be covered. Prerequisite: Latin 202 or permission of the department. 

Latin 498 – Major Seminar
W 4:30-7:00 pm – Baughan
Required of senior Latin majors.  Research methods and the writing and presentation of a research paper.

Latin 499 –Independent Study
W 8:00-8:50 am – Laskaris
Available only through departmental approval arranged prior to registration.

 

Please visit the major/minor page for full details on our curricula and major/minor requirements.